SecurityWorldMarket

20-01-2021

IOT and Smart Buildings – Part 3 of 5

“Open and GDPR-safe technology is the way forward in the age of IoT”

Stids non-contact readers are based on open technology that is compatible with all access control systems via the use of approved security algorithms and interoperable communication technology such as RFID, NFC, HCE and Bluetooth.

Stids non-contact readers are based on open technology that is compatible with all access control systems via the use of approved security algorithms and interoperable communication technology such as RFID, NFC, HCE and Bluetooth.

The French company Stid is one of the world´s largest manufacturers of non-contact readers for access control. The company’s technology is based on an open platform and designed to meet the requirements of today’s GDPR regulations.

“Stid is the first manufacturer in the access control market to have component certification by an EU government organisation ANSSI”, states Robert Jansson, sales director for Stid in the Nordic region and in Eastern Europe.

As we are heading towards smart buildings and smart cities, the importance of secure and reliable identities has become obvious to everyone. Fully functional identity management and access control solutions are crucial for the success of emerging IoT projects.

“That is very true. Secured identification is the core of all smart buildings or smart cities. Everyone and everything needs to have an identity that can be trusted by the systems of the buildings or the cities,” states Robert Jansson, who also emphasises the value of using open technology and GDPR-secured solutions.

USP 1: Open technology

Stid is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of non-contact readers for access control for both people and vehicles. Stid has delivered over a million readers used by over 100 million users. With its open technology approach Stid expects the growth to continue.

“Many markets in Europe have been heavily dominated by local manufacturers and brands offering proprietary technology. It means that the same manufacturers have delivered all parts of the system, including the readers. This has made it more difficult to establish international brands like Stid, “ explains Robert Jansson.

The ongoing digitalisation, and today´s increasing needs for access control solutions offering scalability and simple technology integration, are all factors that contribute to the rising demands for open systems. And this development suits Stid like a glove.

“Not only do we offer one of the market’s widest ranges, but our non-contact readers are also based on open technology that is compatible with all access control systems via the use of approved security algorithms and interoperable communication technology such as RFID, NFC, HCE and Bluetooth. Our philosophy is that Stid’s secured quality readers should be able to be used by everyone,“ comments Robert Jansson.

USP 2: GDPR-secured technology

The implementation of GDPR in the EU is of course another strong growth factor for Stid due to the accomplishment of receiving the ANNSI product certification. But what does that mean?

“GDPR tells us what we are not allowed to do, but not how to do it. Now there is ANSSI, a European standard that actually does that. It covers everything that has to do with how the flow of identities can be secured in systems, whether it is for access control systems or PKI,” states Robert Jansson.

“The ANSSI standard helps customers to GDPR-secure their systems – and above all – their identities, so that they can avoid large fines due to theft and misuse of these,” he adds further.

This is how ANSSI is measured

The ANNSI norm can be divided into different levels, beginning with the access control system components: the sub-central, the readers, the credentials and how these communicate with each other.

If all parts have a secure communication between them, but the keys are on the card reader, then you have an acceptable level. If, on the other hand, you have the same secure communication between each component and the keys are placed on the system and on the credentials, then the preferred level is reached, which is the highest level.

A commodity business model

Robert Jansson has been active in the access control sector for more than 20 years, and is very inspired to take on the challenge to establish Stid’s access control technology in the Nordic countries and Eastern Europe.

“It feels very good to work with a brand with as much emphasis on security and openness as Stid does”, says Robert Jansson.

He also enjoys the fact that Stid sticks to a simple productoriented business model.

“We only charge for the hardware. We have no intention of terminating the service and charging license fees. Although the trend is towards charging for services, we will focus on producing really good readers that our partners can then use in their service businesses”, he says.

Always tested products

Stid emphasises security and quality, and tests all its products for different classifications according to existing accepted international standards. The tests cover all kinds of issues, such as the manufactured units’ resistance to weather or to physical attacks, but also other aspects, such as communication.

Against this background it is not surprising that Stid also became the first access control manufacturer in the access control market to have the ANSSI-certification for the GDPR-readiness of their products called CSPN. This quality confirmation is very important, according to Robert Jansson.

“GDPR-safe access control is very viable. Both in the Nordic countries and in Eastern Europe, which are my markets, open and GDPR secured technology is the way forward in the age of IoT, “ he concludes.he concludes.

Note: This editorial article has primarily been produced for the security trade magazine Detektor in collaboration with Securityworldmarket.com.


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